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II Marine Expeditionary Force

 

II Marine Expeditionary Force

Train. Fight. Win.

Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C.

 

Lt. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund, commanding general of II Marine Expeditionary Force, shares his guidance and priorities for the MEF, and the Marines and Sailors who comprise it. He states Marines of II MEF are constantly deployed while working together and achieving mission success while upholding the four pillars of II MEF: readiness, standards, dignity and respect, and operational excellence. "Every one of you are counted on every day... mission accomplishment won't happen without you," Hedelund said. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Sgt. David Delgadillo)
Lt. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund, commanding general, II Marine Expeditionary Force, explains the need to maintain high standards with II MEF. "It's Marines and Sailors first, military occupational specialty proficiency always, and don't forget to protect what you've earned," he said. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Sgt. Matthew Callahan)
Lt. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund, commanding general, II Marine Expeditionary Force, talks about the need for readiness with II MEF. "We are an expeditionary force in readiness, and the nation is counting on us to be able to fight tonight," he said. Maintaining our readiness is what matters to us." (U.S. Marine Corps video by Sgt. Matthew Callahan)
Lt. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund, commanding general, II Marine Expeditionary Force, explains dignity and respect with II MEF. "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you," he said. "Showing dignity and respect for our fellow Marines and Sailors is what matters to us." (U.S. Marine Corps video by Sgt. Matthew Callahan)
Lt. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund, commanding general, II Marine Expeditionary Force, explains the need for operational excellence with II MEF. "We are always mission focused, lethal, relevant and professional. Because of that, we can always tell the nation 'you can count on us.' Achieving operational excellence is what matters to us," he said. (U.S. Marine Corps Video by Sgt. Matthew Callahan)

WHAT MATTERS TO US

Operational Excellence:

Through tough, realistic training and rigorous assessment, II MEF delivers mission focused, relevant MAGTFs; lethal to our enemies, reliable to our allies and successful across the spectrum of conflict.  Safe execution of all missions is a by-product of professionals doing what they know is right.

Readiness:

Readiness is the bedrock on which we build mission success.  Whether it's the Marine or Sailor, the Family, or the machines and equipment we need to do our work, all must be in top condition.  For the Marine or Sailor: physical, mental and spiritual readiness for you and your Family is a must.

Standards:

Adherence to high standards is what sets us apart.  We embrace our Corps' demand for meeting the standards we hold dear and we hold each other and ourselves accountable.  We must know our profession, our roles, our machines, our capabilities and our limitations - cold.

Dignity & Respect:

We are all inclusive.  Every one of us matters.  Regardless of our distinguishing characteristics, we work as one team and treat each other with respect - always.  We insist on interested, engaged and concerned leadership at every level.  Good command climate is a by-product of taking care of each other and ourselves.

You:

It takes all four pillars of "What Matters To Us" to win, but none of that matters without you. We train hard, we work hard and we fight hard and every one of you are counted on every day. Mission accomplishment won't happen without you. You matter to us.

 



 


U.S. Marines and Sailors prepare to embark the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS New York (LPD 21) before departing in Morehead City, N.C., May 18, 2019. Marines, Sailors and Coast Guardsmen will be in New York to interact with the public, demonstrate capabilities and teach the people of New York about America’s sea services. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jered T. Stone)
U.S. Marines and Sailors embark the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS New York (LPD 21) before departing in Morehead City, N.C., May 18, 2019. Marines, Sailors and Coast Guardsmen will be in New York to interact with the public, demonstrate capabilities and teach the people of New York about America’s sea services. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jered T. Stone)
U.S. Marines with Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Africa 19.1 perform routine maintenance on the MV-22 Osprey at Naval Air Station Sigonella, Italy, Dec. 18, 2018. SPMAGTF-CR-AF is deployed to conduct crisis-response and theater-security operations in Europe and Africa. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bethanie Ryan)
U.S. Marines and Sailors embark the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS New York (LPD 21) before departing in Morehead City, N.C., May 18, 2019. Marines, Sailors and Coast Guardsmen will be in New York to interact with the public, demonstrate capabilities and teach the people of New York about America’s sea services. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jered T. Stone)
A Marine sights in on a target during a combat marksmanship program at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug 31, 2017. The Marines took part in the routine qualification training to maintain their combat skills for mission readiness. The Marine is with 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Nicholas Guevara)
U.S. Marines with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, hike back to their quarters after a house clearing range as part of a deployment for training exercise at Fort Pickett, Va., Feb. 23, 2018. The range provided Marines the opportunity to improve maneuver tactics, and work with fire teams in close quarter movements. The DFT refines collective warfighting skills and functions in order to prepare for future combat operations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Pfc. Heather Atherton)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Hector Gutierresseverino, a Marine with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, cuts hair in the barber shop aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge, Jan. 21, 2019. The Marines and Sailors with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit and Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group are currently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of naval operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the Central region, connecting the Mediterranean and the Pacific through the western Indian Ocean and three strategic choke points. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Antonio Garcia)
U.S. Marines fire an M2 .50 caliber machine gun, mounted to an amphibious assault vehicle, at simulated enemy targets during Large scale Exercise (LSE) 17 at Twentynine Palms, Calif., Aug. 17, 2017. LSE-17 was a multinational exercise, led by 2nd Marine Division, with elements from the United Kingdom, France, Canada and II Marine Expeditionary Force, focused on integrating all capabilities of the Marine Air-Ground Task Force and coalition forces. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Taylor Cooper)
U.S. Marines and Sailors with Alpha company, 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, participate in fast rope training at Camp Lejeune, N.C., April 26, 2018. Each Marine rappelled with packs and a combat load to simulate real life scenarios in preparation for an upcoming deployment with 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Caleb T. Maher)
U.S. Marines with II Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group, fire M2 machine guns during the II MIG Field Exercise at Camp Lejeune, N.C., March 5, 2018. Marines participated in the range to prepare for future operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Larisa Chavez)
Sergeant Joseph Adams, a 2nd Law Enforcement Battalion military working dog-handler, shouts commands at his dog, Gunner, as they swim in the Area 5 pool at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 3, 2018. 2nd LEB practiced aggression training as part of specialized training to familiarize their dogs with water. The 2nd LEB military working dogs benefit from this particular type of training due to not being exposed to water tactics during initial training periods and become better accustomed to performing duties in atypical situations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Austyn Saylor)
A U.S. Marine assigned to the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit hugs his family as he prepares to leave for an overseas deployment at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Dec. 18, 2018. The 22nd MEU will serve as a sea-based, expeditionary crisis response force, ready and able to conduct military operations on a moment’s notice. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Heather Atherton)
A U.S. Marine with II Marine Expeditionary Force sprays off a trailer before storing them on USNS Wright (T-AVB 3) before embarkation to Norway at the Port of Morehead City in Beaufort, N.C., Sept. 28, 2018. These vehicles will be used as part of II MEFs participation in the NATO-led Exercise Trident Juncture 18 in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Iceland. Trident Juncture 18 enhances the U.S. and NATO Allies’ abilities to work together collectively to conduct military operations under challenging conditions. Trident Juncture will include more than 14,000 U.S. service members and 31 Allied and partner nations, totaling more than 40,000 NATO troops. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Samuel Lyden)
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Ruben Torres, an assaultmen squad leader, and Lance Cpl. Cameron H. Machado, an assaultmen gunner, both with Suicide Charley Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, Marine Air-Ground Task Force-6 fire a Shoulder-Mounted Assault Weapon during Integrated Taining Exercise 2-19 on Range 410A aboard Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., Jan. 22, 2019. ITX creates a challenging, realistic training environment that produces combat-ready forces capable of operating as an integrated MAGTF. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Nathaniel Q. Hamilton)
Kristen Johnson, military legislative assistant to Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas, receives a tour of a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Nov. 26, 2018. Johnson traveled to Camp Lejeune to observe different elements of the Marine Air-Ground Task Force’s expeditionary capabilities and to become familiar with the structure of the United States Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Taylor W. Cooper)
Kristen Johnson, military legislative assistant to Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas, tours a CH53-E Super Stallion at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Nov. 26, 2018. Johnson traveled to Camp Lejeune to observe different elements of the Marine Air-Ground Task Force’s expeditionary capabilities and to become familiar with the structure of the United States Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Taylor W. Cooper)