Photo Information

A Marine with Headquarters Platoon, 2nd Naval Air Gunfire Liaison Company, II Marine Expeditionary Force Headquarters Group communicates with Marines in the convoy during combat convoy simulations training aboard Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, August 4, 2015. The combat convoy simulators provide an immersive environment for convoy operations training for command and control procedures in tactical scenarios related to combat operations.

Photo by Lance Cpl. Immanuel Johnson

Marines experience the battlefront from a simulated approach

6 Aug 2015 | Lance Cpl. Immanuel Johnson II MEF Headquarters Group

The 2nd Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, II Marine Expeditionary Force Headquarters Group, conducted combat convoy simulation training aboard Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, August 4, 2015, in order to gain a realistic understanding for conducting operations in a combat situation.

The combat convoy simulators provide an immersive environment for convoy operations training for command and control procedures, including vehicle and convoy commanders in tactical scenarios related to combat convoy operations, according to the Camp Lejeune Training Support Division website.

The Marines are going through a computer program which enables them to get a general idea of what it’s like to be on the battlefield,” said GySgt. Kent Medlin, the motor transport chief with Headquarters Platoon, 2nd ANGLICO.

“What we do is we put our Marines inside of these simulated vehicles, and run them through a computer program which enables them to get a general idea of what it’s like to be on the battlefield.”

The combat convoy simulation center provides a realistic expectation of what a combat zone would look and feel like while inside a Humvee; moving in a convoy counteracting IEDs and the potential for ambushes.

“First off they go inside the command operations center, observing the convoys, and sit down with a blank strip map of what the Marines want to go over,” said David Schrecongost, a combat convoy simulator instructor. “We observe the dispersion of the Humvees including encountering and cordoning IEDs.”

Placing Marines inside the simulator allows them to counteract IEDs through a simulated approach, giving them a chance to analyze their surroundings and notice the potential for ambushes as well.

“You have to trust the person inside the vehicle,” Medlin said. “Your driver is there to make sure you don’t hit any IED’s, your gunners are constantly watching what is going on around you, they’re the first line of defense.”

“We’ll start them off with a couple simulated IEDs, once they progress they’ll be getting complex ambushes and IED’s left and right getting that approach into their minds,” said Schrecongost. “By the end of the day you can definitely notice an improvement in action and countering IEDs.