Unit Banner could not be loaded.

 

II Marine Expeditionary Force

Readiness. Standards. Values.

Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C.
Co. K recruits learn Water Survial Basic

By Lance Cpl. Bridget M. Keane | | January 17, 2013

Photos
prev
1 of 5
next
Recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, use a waterproof pack to swim 25 meters in the water during Water Survival Basic aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 7.

Recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, use a waterproof pack to swim 25 meters in the water during Water Survival Basic aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 7. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Bridget M. Keane)


Photo Details | Download |

Recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, prepare for a 10-second gear strip underwater during a portion of Water Survival Basic aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 7.

Recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, prepare for a 10-second gear strip underwater during a portion of Water Survival Basic aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 7. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Bridget M. Keane)


Photo Details | Download |

Recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, jump into the water for their first portion of Water Survival Basic aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 7. They are required to swim 25 meters in the shallow end of the pool in a full combat utility uniform and combat boots.

Recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, jump into the water for their first portion of Water Survival Basic aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 7. They are required to swim 25 meters in the shallow end of the pool in a full combat utility uniform and combat boots. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Bridget M. Keane)


Photo Details | Download |

Recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, tread water for four minutes in the deep end of the pool during Water Survival Basic aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 7. Recruits learn how to utilize their gear around themselves if they were to fall overboard.

Recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, tread water for four minutes in the deep end of the pool during Water Survival Basic aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 7. Recruits learn how to utilize their gear around themselves if they were to fall overboard. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Bridget M. Keane)


Photo Details | Download |

A Marine Corps Instructor of Water Survival gives last minute instruction to a Co. K recruit who is about to enter the depot swim tank from the ten-foot platform Jan. 7. Recruits are required to learn how to swim in their combat utility uniforms and boots as a graduation requirement.

A Marine Corps Instructor of Water Survival gives last minute instruction to a Co. K recruit who is about to enter the depot swim tank from the ten-foot platform Jan. 7. Recruits are required to learn how to swim in their combat utility uniforms and boots as a graduation requirement. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Bridget M. Keane)


Photo Details | Download |

San Diego --     In their fourth week of training, recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, went through basic swim qualification aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 7.
    Water Survival Basic is a graduation requirement that teaches recruits how to survive in an aquatic environment using different strokes and techniques while wearing a full utility uniform and combat boots.
    “It’s important for recruits to learn how to swim in (their uniform) because Marines must be (adaptable) to all environments,” said Sgt. Ricardo Robles, drill instructor, Platoon 3229, Co. K, 3rd RTBn. “They might be in a situation where they need to swim to save their own life, as well as those around them, while wearing a full combat load.”
    The course of qualification requires a 25-meter swim in both the shallow and deep ends of the Olympic-sized pool, tread water for four minutes, use a waterproof pack to swim 25 meters and perform a 10-second gear strip while submerged.
    Some recruits might see swim qualification as just another training event to get through, not knowing about the challenges they may face. Even confident swimmers have difficulty moving through water in their uniform.
    “A lot of recruits are afraid to get in the water with gear on. They don’t know how it feels to swim with all the extra weight,” said Robles. “But once they complete the training, it can really boost their confidence.”
    Recruits that have never swam before tend to have a hard time relaxing in the water, but each of them learn about their strengths and weaknesses. Some recruits might even face their fears as they step into the water. 
    “This is my first time really swimming, so I was really nervous getting in the water,” explained Recruit Heliot Alvarez, Plt. 3233, Co. K, 3rd RTBn. “I felt so heavy and had a hard time moving forward.”
    Although Alvarez didn’t qualify at first, he left the pool feeling confident that he would be able to meet the requirements the next day. Recruits that don’t qualify the first day are given remediation classes and another chance to qualify. Instructors work one-on-one with recruits to ensure they learn each technique correctly.
    “I think going through (swim qualification) can mentally prepare you for other obstacles in recruit training,” said Alvarez. “Overcoming something you might be afraid of for the first time can really boost your confidence and help make you stronger mentally.” 
    Recruits of Co. K were drenched in relief after completing one of the final events in their first phase of training. Now, with the knowledge and skills of Water Survival Basic, recruits move on to their next challenge in recruit training—marksmanship—which will take place at Edson Range aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif.


No Comments


Add Comment

(required)
  Post Comment